2001

  • Alucard's

    09/24/2021 - 11:35 by Anonymous (not verified)
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    root
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  • Micro Stuff. Sex, Suicide, Space, And Sup. G. Newsom.

    09/24/2021 - 11:35 by Anonymous (not verified)
    Original Author
    root
    Original Body
    pstrong pbWho's Behind Newsom orbr / am I wrong and he's his own man./bbr //p pbIts better know if ourbr / chain is being pulled andbr / who if anyone is at the other end./bbr / /p/strong/p pDIV align="left" TABLE cellpadding="5"TR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TDTR VALIGN="TOP"TD pby Joe B./p pI’ve been thinking about the so-called battle of the sexes, it occurred to me killing each other does not bode well for surviving generations repeating the cycle. /p pThere always be Misogynists on both sides of the sexes./p pHowever there are friendly allies the enemies. /p pI propose that we of like and love persuasion should build starships with cryonics sleep or suspended animation that double as emergency escape pods. /p pLeave earth for living on asteroids, natural or artificial satellites while groundhog earthers tare at each other’s throats./p pBy the time a few centuries have passed and they’ve learned what we already knew b"Peaceful Co-existence Between The Sexes" /b /p pWe'll have made other kinds of humanity, evolving quicker, living every where in the cosmos./p pI know it’s an extreme solution but better that than both sexes constantly killing each other. /p pI was just thinking of space as an extreme survival mechanism./p pOther than that I don’t how our species will survive let along survive if males are killing women or circumventing births of females assumed not as valuable./p pMaybe people will figure out what makes certain males rage enough to kill or women do the same. /p pAny neuroscience to prevent this from happening? br / /ppLast Thursday, July 18, 2002 after a meeting with the Coalition on Homelessness, Media Alliance, and I think another but I’ve forgotten./p pI don’t know where we went but it was in someone’s comfortable Van to a pro test against small business at O’Keeffe O’Keeffe Attorney’s at Law offices./p pOne of the green street signs has Taraval on it and across the street are apartments and a nail manicure business./p pA guy I’ll car Art has more investigative chops than I talk of Newsom loving the publicity and as cops on cycles, standing around, and across the street. /p pGetting 7 to 10,000 dollars overtime for essentially doing an easy stand-do-nothing payday while protesters and tax payers’ foot the bill while Sup. Gavin Newsom gets free on-air time./p pIt never occurred to me that constant talking about Newsome, his plans actually fuel-feeds his campaign run for mayor for 2004!/p pArt said, "It’s not Newsom we should protesting he’s probably a figurehead and behind him are people backing his run like The Golden Gate Restaurant Association and Small Business concerns" He is sure there are other organizations and people too and that who we should be targeting."/p pHmmm, Sup. Gavin Newsom, a straw-man or public face to focus on while others with more power and influence pulling strings like some bPower- Behind -The –Throne/b uPuppet on a string deal. /u/p pMr. Art may just be able to have something there. /p pHey, San Franciscan’s and I’m writing to those both for and against Newsom before I’d make a commitment to vote for a future Mayor, Senator, Governor, or possibly higher office holder./p p Wouldn’t you want to know where his true loyalties lie?/p pHe probably is his own man, however with former candidate for President Pat Robertson or Buchanan with his "Culture War" you may not have liked what he said but he was being real on how he felt and what he is for and against./p pWith Sup. Gavin Newsom what is unknown is most of his backers./p pThere’s probably an old hunter’s saying, "If a dog is tame, wild, or plain lazy watch who’s holding the end of the chain. /p pSo who is Newsom ultimately beholden too. /p pIt does not matter to me but for true blue for Newsom voters./p pWouldn’t you really want to know who is behind the Newsom campaign?/p pBecause win or lose if Newsom isn’t his own man it would be best to know it now rather than have folks come from out surrounding that cannot trust because you don’t know or recognize them./p pHope you all are thinking ahead a little bit about the people behind Newsom. /p pNow, its up to you readers to do what you can, choosing the next Mayor or other political posts … Bye./p/td/tr/td/tr/table/div/p
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  • The people of my community know my heart

    09/24/2021 - 11:35 by Anonymous (not verified)
    Original Author
    root
    Original Body
    pstrongDisplaced Hunter's Point Activist Keeps up the Battle.br / br /Pt 2 in the PNN series on the SF election process /strong/p pDIV align="left" TABLE cellpadding="5"TR VALIGN="TOP"TDIMG SRC= "../sites/default/files/arch_img/913/photo_1_supplement.jpg" //td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TDTR VALIGN="TOP"TD pby Gretchen Hildebran/PNN Community Journalist/p pOn the TV screen the strong, intelligentbr / African-American woman turns her face bravely towardsbr / City Hall, insisting on her right to retain her job atbr / the top levels of government. She is flanked bybr / people from her community denouncing the racism ofbr / commissioners who had recently fired her. Mybr / co-worker Nancy had just called me into the office tobr / watch Tammy Haygood, the head of the SF department ofbr / elections, fight for her job. Nancy turns from thebr / set and tells me in a hushed tone, "Her partner isbr / transgender! They don't want to give him anbr / operation! " /p pWhat is wrong with this picture? A scandal at the SFbr / Department of Elections is nothing new, but thisbr / scandal had nothing to do with the missing ballots,br / ballot box lids floating in the bay, undercountedbr / precincts, police harassment of voters or the generalbr / corruption and mismanagement that has plagued thebr / department over the last several years. Thebr / newscaster never mentioned the fact the SF Departmentbr / of Elections had yet to comply with CA Secretary ofbr / State Bill Jones demand for a recanvassing of thebr / November 2000 vote. Nor was it brought up that thebr / Elections Commission, who allegedly fired Tammybr / Haygood for mismanagement and overspending of citybr / funds, was created when voters approved Prop E in 2001br / to respond to our Cityís criminally sloppy elections.br / Thanks to commercial media we were instead treated tobr / a sensationalized version of Tammy Haygood's personalbr / struggles. Meanwhile at the Department of Elections,br / it is business as usual. Supervisor Tom Ammiano, whobr / is considering a run for mayor in 2003, says,"This isbr / a distraction from the real issue, which is to get thebr / election department running again and give the votersbr / what they voted for with Prop E."/p pAmmiano remembers the past several elections andbr / recalls, "We were very unhappy, there may have beenbr / widespread corruption, and the whole thing could havebr / been wired. We were looking forward to Prop E as abr / way to address electoral fraud." The propositionbr / created the elections commission as a means to makebr / reporting and investigation of electoral fraud morebr / accessible and effective. But when the commissionbr / took steps to fire Haygood, an appointee of thebr / Mayor's, things took a turn for the ugly./p p"The Mayor is unrelenting," says Ammiano, "He's notbr / letting the election commission do what we put thembr / there for." Itís no surprise that the Mayor wouldnítbr / be interested in enacting the reforms approved by thebr / voters. Willie Brownís legacy has included a stringbr / of elections marred by disenfranchisement and fraud inbr / low-income communities, especially those in Districtbr / 10 which encompasses the Bayview, Potrero Hill andbr / Hunter's Point neighborhoods./p pThis November, District 10, along with all other evenbr / numbered districts in the city, will elect Supervisorsbr / to represent their district in City Hall. And withbr / nothing changed in the elections department, itbr / remains to be seen whether voters will be toobr / discouraged to get to the polls. Unfortunately, whilebr / the community can still mobilize to get out the vote,br / one major factor will limit District 10 votersíbr / decisions at the polls. The community-based advocatebr / Marie Harrison won't be on November's ballot.br / In a recent interview, Harrison explained thatbr / environmental pollution and economic factors willbr / prevent her from entering the race this fall. Highbr / rents made it difficult to find a place in Hunterísbr / Point for her whole family to live. Her five year oldbr / grandson has developed environmental illness,br / including asthma. Her family found they had tobr / relocate outside the district. Supervisors arebr / required to have their primary residence in thebr / district they represent, so the move disqualifiedbr / Harrison from the race. /p p" We can truly not afford to live here," shebr / explained,"to put my family through this, I had to bebr / assured that this will be a fair and honest race."br / Harrison has reason to doubt her chances for such abr / race. As a candidate for District 10 Supervisor inbr / the November 2000 election, she witnessed widespreadbr / intimidation, coercion and election day violations inbr / the polls she visited. (See "Disappearing Votes,br / Disappearing Communities") Many votes from her corebr / constituents also vanished once the ballots werebr / counted. /p pMany of the groups who mobilize the community to vote,br / such as the A. Philip Randolph Institute, work tobr / ensure that their communities carry the big partybr / lines on election day. Not surprisingly, APRI wasbr / also at the helm of the campaign to reinstate Tammybr / Haygood after her dismissal. This kind of poorbr / leadership within the community, Harrison claims, hasbr / betrayed any real chance of its representation inbr / government./p p "In the era of Willie Brown, its all about how muchbr / money you have. People are not out there to representbr / the community, they are there for my folks, theybr / want to see what they can get out of it." Harrisonbr / made clear. According to her, nearly all of thebr / politicians out there "owe something to somebody."br / She insists that isn't a sacrifice she would be ablebr / to make, which has meant she has had to turn down manybr / offers of support that arrived with strings attached.br / Although she wonít be on the ballot, she insisted,br / "I'm not out of the game." Harrison still works inbr / the community and she is advising people to write inbr / their choice for Supervisor if they donít like any ofbr / the candidates." That vote is like money in the bank,"br / she said, "spend it like it was your last dime.br / Explore your options, take a chance and send abr / message." Over and over again she stressed thebr / importance of continuing to vote, a sign of her ownbr / powerful commitment to community power. /p pHarrison's rich and warming voice and her solidbr / philosophies come back to me as I watch the crowds ofbr / politicians swarm after Haygood on the TV screen. Thebr / media circus is yet another distraction from the realbr / issues that people like Marie Harrison are fightingbr / for. As she put it, "We are fighting for a chance tobr / survive, to see our children grow up healthy inbr / Hunterís Point." And while politicians and theirbr / appointees scramble for money and position, leadersbr / like Harrison carry on beyond the ballot box and thebr / media frenzy. As she concluded before hanging up, "Ibr / am still battling for my community. I will fight tillbr / this thing is done."/p pFor more information Read pt 1; Disappearing Votes, disappearing communities by Gretchen Hildebran /p/td/tr/td/tr/table/div/p
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  • Sistas In Savage Society And Birth Deprivatory

    09/24/2021 - 11:35 by Anonymous (not verified)
    Original Author
    root
    Original Body
    pstrongA poem about single mothers/strong/p pDIV align="left" TABLE cellpadding="5"TR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TDTR VALIGN="TOP"TD pby Marlon Crump/Poverty Scholar POOR Magazine/p p Did y'all see?/p pbr / Did y'all see?/p p You reekersbr / br / of public reliefers,br / br / when she told youbr / br / she had to work lengthy hours,br / br / while you smiled,br / br / a vile and vicious smile.br / br / You knewbr / br / she had to drift a couple of miles,br / br / with ancient shoes on her feet,br / br / a house with no heatbr / br / and giving her a workfarebr / br / she can never complete:/p p You did so,br / br / sitting in office leather upholstery,br / br / engulfed by lies of leisures,br / br / weekend planning of nightclubs,br / br / stacked with papersbr / br / of promissory poverties.br / br / You still askbr / br / her repeated questions to annoy her,br / br / frustrate her,br / br / irritatebr / br / and economically eradicate her./p p The babies are crying to be fed,br / br / then put into bed,br / br / so she can't utter defeat:/p p Your houses/studio-apartmentsbr / br / fuel your energy and ego,br / br / as her superior,br / br / while you shame and defile her plightbr / br / in light of her fight as a multiple mom,br / br / but inferior in your sight.br / br / Your eyes are shut,br / br / unseen that you too also lackbr / br / the great castle act,br / br / while she sought solacebr / br / and refuge with her young,br / br / in her habitat,br / br / with her back holding the shack:/p p Did y'all see?/p p When caseworkersbr / br / of no guest workers,br / br / when she so-desperatedly sought refugebr / br / in your country that you so vowbr / br / as the land of the free,br / br / but didn't lift a finger to aid her?br / br / Nothing but her ownselfbr / br / and little dignity she had left.br / br / Your sadistic manly desiresbr / br / falsely promised her salvation,br / br / if she let you pin her back:/p p Even in safehavensbr / br / you call shelters,br / br / she's promised a bottom bunk,br / br / a decent bath and a nourishing fed,br / br / you still bestow your powerbr / br / upon her to share your bed.br / br / "Unless I comply,br / br / I may die,br / br / as a resultbr / br / of hot lead" you said.br / br / At this point,br / br / her face is blood-red:/p p What about a pregnant mom,br / br / looking for someone tobr / br / at least be heldbr / br / and told that her childbr / br / will cry and not die.br / br / Shes see the father walk by,br / br / she asks why?br / br / He just sneeredbr / br / as he walks by,br / br / with a pathetic ass sigh.br / br / Her son will not live this lie,br / br / alive or dead:/p p Did ya'll see?br / br / When a young mom couldn't evenbr / br / complete the alphabet,br / br / but now lives to regret,br / br / being upset after tossing her childbr / br / from elevationbr / br / higher than Mount Everest,br / br / seeing and fleeingbr / br / for luxuriesbr / br / from a colored T.V. set?:/p p Her selfless pity,br / br / o iddity bitty,br / br / of siddity,br / br / with wealth and romance,br / br / of so much finance,br / br / with a decorated carriagebr / br / of her own initiated miscarriage,br / br / of a now drifted off life.br / br / A lifebr / who's own altitude bearing wingsbr / br / clipped,br / br / by a mom's longitudebr / br / of lust for leisures,br / br / a tale too tragicbr / br / for anyone to forget:/p p Did ya'll see?/p p When a mom plagued by demonsbr / br / and ghost whispers,br / br / brain sustained as insane,br / br / with no nerves of steel,br / br / no heart to healbr / br / or spouse to feel.br / br / She tries desperatedlybr / br / to love her off and spring,br / br / but agents of infantsbr / br / take them off as they sing,br / br / promising thembr / br / what tomorrow will bring:/p p What must I, how can I, where can I, who can I,br / br / or why can I,br / br / make any of youbr / br / feel,br / br / see,br / br / smell,br / br / hearbr / br / or even taste the earth,br / br / wind,br / br / water,br / br / or fire I walk through.br / br / I couldn't, wouldn't or shouldn't have to./p p Did you'all ever see?br / br / Hurry up and arise,br / br / before your bell starts to ring,br / br / Bling, Bling, Bling, Bling:/p p "To every struggling mother in the universe,br / br / The Lord thy Father,br / br / is one baby's fatherbr / br / that will never forgetbr / br / to hold the fruit from your womb,br / br / even while the other doesn't.br / br / Whether the child is downbr / br / below or up and above,br / br / he will never escapebr / br / His Undying Love."/p pMarlon Crump 10/31/2006br / /p/td/tr/td/tr/table/div/p
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  • Listening To WHOM?!?

    09/24/2021 - 11:35 by Anonymous (not verified)
    Original Author
    root
    Original Body
    pstrongHealth and Human Services’, Tommy Thompson’s “Listening” session on welfare reform became the day of REAL voices, real action and a little dialogue with Health and Human Services../strong/p pDIV align="left" TABLE cellpadding="5"TR VALIGN="TOP"TDIMG SRC= "../sites/default/files/arch_img/552/photo_1_feature.jpg" //td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TDTR VALIGN="TOP"TD pby Lisa Gray-Garcia (a.k.a. Tiny) /p pi“My Mom came to visit Wade Horn - all I got was this sign....”/i Aimee Fisher, a low income mom struggling to go to college while on welfare, protesting Tommy Thompson’s “Listening” session outside the Grand Hyatt Hotel./p pThere were glasses of ice water at each corner.. tall shimmering glasses untouched, pure, without a bead of sweat, or a drop of unsightly moisture. The glasses stood erect and cool at each corner of the immense rectangle table—draped with an ivory starched table cloth bordered in a flowing ruffle. The carpet was the color of blood, with black and blue diamonds weaving through rivers of crimson acrylic./p pThe table was dwarfed by eight large flags. The focal point was a floor to ceiling banner proclaiming the purpose of the meeting I was allowed to witness, but not invited to: HEARING FROM THE STATES—HHS NATIONAL LISTENING TOUR ON TANF REAUTHORIZATION. /p pYou see, I, as a former very low-income, welfare recipient and current project director of an organization that fights for the rights of welfare recipients and attempts to create jobs for folks on welfare in journalism and media—a profession usually reserved for people with the privilege of time, formal education and financial stability—was not invited to this event. But, as a journalist, I was shuttled into the room by a velvet voiced man in a tan suit with honey colored eyes. A badge with my name on it was rapidly manufactured on a special badge-making machine. A few words were murmured to a blue-suited gatekeeper with a clear coil attached to his ears, and the palace doors were flung open. I was shuttled into THE ROOM joining a “court” of about 50 people who were sitting quietly, their faces carefully trained into an odd glaze of admiration, boredom and fear. /p pAt the head of the table was Wade Horn, Assistant Secretary for Children and Families for The Department of Health and Human Services; appointed by Tommy Thompson to facilitate these “listening” sessions. These sessions, according to the HHS press release was created by HHS Secretary Tommy G. Thompson as a series of national "listening and discussion sessions”, to gather insights from those on the front lines of welfare reform. /p pThese sessions are supposed to help prepare for next year's reauthorization of federal welfare reform legislation. /p pThe nation's governors, state legislators, county officials, welfare program directors and welfare recipients will be invited to discuss ways to strengthen the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, which was created by the welfare reform legislation enacted in 1996. The sessions will allow Secretary Thompson and other top HHS officials to learn more about states' experiences implementing welfare reforms and running assistance programs. /p pThe room was peopled by the heads of state and local welfare departments from the western states, including our own Trent Rohr and Dolores Heaven from the San Francisco Department of Human Services. There was one welfare recipient present./p p“ The central focus of work-first is still our priority”, said a man with a placard stating his name as Andrew Bush from the front of the table to the right of Wade Horn. As I entered, he was saying, “We should still get people a job if they can get one—but we should be able to include part time work and education in the plan.” /p p“ I make ten dollars per hour. I would like to be able to pursue an education that would allow me to make a better wage,” said Michelle Kramer, the sole TANF recipient in the room spoke /p p“ In Washington 70 percent of our caseload is cycling on and off welfare, we struggle with the dollars that go to direct services,” explained a representative from DHS in Washington./p p“ The problem with the old Welfare system is it gives people a lot of money to do nothing, and the American people are not interested in supporting that anymore. But I don’t think they would begrudge them (welfare recipients) funding for education...” I looked up from my tattered notebook to hear who had made that statement, and found it was him, Wade Horn, spewing out the “Welfare Mom Myth”, believing and subscribing to the stereotype that folks on welfare get “all that money” (345 dollars per month in California, as low as 139 dollars in several southern states) and that they do now or ever did do “nothing”. /p pAs a poor woman raised on welfare, when my mother was not able to work, there was never a moment that we did nothing, because survival is a job and 345 dollars didn’t come close to survival And we, like most of the folks who I work with now, are ialways/i doing a million things just to stay housed, fed and alive. Now, as welfare reform pushes folks into “work-first” jobs that pay less than a living wage we are doing even more. As the words continued to pour out of his mouth, I was unable to hear them. My ears became blocked and dull ache clouded my eyes./p pNeedless to say, I could not stay anymore. I could not stay in that room witnessing those lies and stereotypes as folks, my folks, stood outside this building protesting the farce of this so-called listening session. I begged a hasty good-bye to the honey-voiced man and asked him if another reporter from POOR could come in my stead. He sort of agreed and I ran out of the palace doors before he could say yes. /p pbThe Voices Of Truth..Outside... /b/p pi“Why won’t you listen to us Mr. Wade Horn—we got somethin’ you should learn....”/i/p pThe pillars were white and tall, with a wall of shimmering glass and concrete reaching up into the bright blue sky, framing the gold letters: The Grand Hyatt Hotel./p pThere were over 200 mothers, fathers, children and welfare rights advocates from LIFETIME, POWER, CEWR, Center For Third World Organizing, POOR Magazine, Every Mother is a working Mother, Homeless Prenatal Program and many more, walking in protest in front of the Grand Hyatt Hotel. Martina Gillis from Coalition for Ethical Welfare Reform (CEWR) and Jason Negron from POWER were at the microphone in the center of the crowd. /p p“Why are we out here?” Because Wade Horn and Tommy Thompson only want to listen to certain people, and those people are not the welfare recipients themselves. We know what we need. We know what we want. We know that we need real support to go to school, to get a living wage job and we are not getting that now; we are getting time limits and sanctions for education—he wants to give sanctions to unmarried mothers.. And we know this “listening” session is just a dog and pony show.../p pAt that moment some street theatre commenced in the middle of the protest. Gigantic dogs and ponies slung fake promises and false stereotypes—my favorite was the forced Foster Care dog (DHS pays more to foster care parents to care for children than their own mothers). The last act of the street theatre included tearing up the signs of false promises./p pIn the middle of the action a police officer came out and told Martina Gillis that some of the people from the protest would be allowed to speak to Wade Horn. When Martina said that yes, she and others from the protest would like to speak to Wade Horn, they reneged and said it wouldn’t be Wade Horn, but someone else from DHS./p pAfter several more speakers including mothers in college from LIFETIME, economic justice organizers from Every Mother is a Working Mother, People Organized to Win Employment Rights, and poetry from Leroy Moore of The Po’ Poets Project at POOR Magazine, the action was over and we were all readying ourselves to leave....almost... /p pbThe Real Listening Session (sort-of )/b/p piIn 1965, Senator Moynihan published a report entitled; “The Negro Family A case for National Action”. The central thesis of his report was that, “ At the heart of the deterioration of the fabric of Negro society is the deterioration of the Negro Family —that at least half of the Blacks in America are enmeshed in a “tangle of pathology” centered around the “matriarchal family structure”/i.. excerpt From The Nature of Mama , an interview with Dr. Wade Nobles by Dee Gray in POOR Magazine Volume #4/p pI sat on the brick steps of the Grand Hyatt exchanging notes with Gretchen Hildebran, one of the reporters for POOR Magazine who took my place in the “Listening Session”, inside the hotel with Wade Horn and she attended his press conference which followed the session. She reported to me what the token welfare recipient said in the press conference that “welfare reform was great—she has no problems with it. ” And Wade Horn kept mentioning how well they (DHS) were doing “with children” which made Gretchen wonder what DHS was planning to do with policy. i.e., youth crime laws, etc..., that he would be able to justify with his purported welfare reform success. He also mentioned that the “protesters” outside just needed to learn how to communicate better. Finally, when she tried to ask her question which had to do with The Fatherhood Initiative, he barely answered and then closed the conference./p piOver the last four decades, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of children growing up in homes without fathers. In 1960, fewer than 10 million children did not live with their fathers. Today, the number is nearly 25 million. More than one-third of these children will not see their fathers at all during the course of a year. Studies show thatbr / children who grow up without responsible fathers are significantly more likely to experience poverty, perform poorly in school, engage in criminal activity, and abuse drugs and alcohol/i.... Excerpt from the overview of the FATHERHOOD Initiative /p pOne of the main concerns of all of us at the protest, as poor mothers and fathers on welfare, poor youth and children of poor single mothers and fathers was Tommy Thompson’s Fatherhood Initiative. The welfare reform law provides for performance bonuses to reward states for achieving certain measurable goals, including promoting marriage and reducing out-of-wedlock pregnancies. Thompson’s Administration for Children and Families encourages states to use funding from the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program (TANF) to develop responsible fatherhood programs and has issued guidance with examples of such efforts. /ppToday, almost half of all states use TANF funds for fatherhood programs. On its face these ideas are good sound, but the reality is, as Dee Gray’s interview with Dr. Nobles in POOR Magazine outlines, the policy itself is based on the same kind of transubstantive error that Moynihan made in the 60’s, and in fact, from the same kind of claims, and penalizes or sanctions poor single headed households, just for being poor single parents./p piThe idea of transubstantiation is that in looking at the surface behaviors of a people, you can draw conclusions about the meaning and value of behaviors, but the meaning and the value comes from the deep structure of a people’s culture and values. and so in the Black Family at the time Moynihan was examining it, there was this whole notion of families with women without husbands raising children, which he deemed a broken home from his cultural deep structure which was not that of the families he was examining.../iWade Nobles in the Nature of Mama/p pAfter I said good-bye to Gretchen and several folks from the protest had left, Joseph Bolden from POOR and I were collecting our stuff on the steps when out of the corner of my eye I saw a four person brigade of suits and suddenly Joe’s hand was being shook and... “ Hello, I’m wade Horn.” A tall man in a gray suit with a red tie, a little tuft of curly black hair that sat on the very top of his head and blood shot eyes, was shaking my limp hand./p p“Hi. I’m Lisa Gray-Garcia from POOR Magazine,” I choked in response./p p“I know who you are.” I wondered why—was I on his wire tapping list? He continued, “Would you like to ask us some questions, I hear that you would all like to talk with us...” /p p“ Uh yea.. I guess,” I tried to think through the weirdness of the moment, and wondered where everyone else was.. “I mean, yes... just let me get my pen.. and notebook .” I desperately tugged at my impossibly disorganized backpack to find something to write on and something to write with. Finally pulling out an eye pencil, I commenced with the interview ..hoping that if Joe and I could stall them long enough with questions, some of the people who had remained would start to gather./p p“Is it true that you want to cut off welfare benefits of families who aren’t married? “ I asked./p p“We are interested in promoting two-parent families.. it is important to the health of the children that they have two parents.”/p p“ But are you saying that there should be sanctions against single parent TANF recipients?” I continued./p p“No, of course not, “ he shook his small hair tuft from side to side, “ We don’ t want abusive relationships to stay together, we are only instituting premarital education classes, conflict resolution training, incentives to families to stay married and [we are] trying to help them improve their skills to do so.”/p pAnd then everyone was there. We were surrounded—the small crowd that was left realized what was going on and Jason Negron from POWER cut in, “ We have a lot of folks here who would like you to hear their concerns. Libby, a mother on welfare from POWER began, “ As a mother I would like to be able to have my secondary and post secondary education accepted as welfare to work activity rather than sanctioned by welfare like it is now,” she proffered to him./p p“We are looking at educational opportunities right now.” I for one didn’t understand his answer..but.../p p“ I raised my children on welfare and I now work with mothers on welfare,” a representative from Every Mother is A Working Mother cut in. “ What I want to know and many of the mothers that I represent is why can’t you value mothering as a form of work—the work that mothers do is very hard and deserves wages just like any other job —we want you to answer that”/p p“ Well, I believe that the role of mothers is very important and we care a lot about children. They are our main concern.”/p p“But that’s not what I am asking, what I am asking is will you consider valuing mothering as waged work, i.e. wages for mothering? “/p pI watched Wade’s eyes. He gulp/blinked, unable to create another truly smooth reply../p p“I want you to answer that Mr. Horn.”/p p“Well...” Wade sputtered, his eyes blinking rapidly. /p p“Eschucha. Yo soy madre.” Nora Calderon from Homeless Prenatal Program and POWER interrupted with a similar question but geared toward the specific plight of poor immigrant mothers on welfare. Cindy Weisner, from POWER, acted as her translator. “She wants to know why you penalize immigrant mothers when they need to stay home and raise their children. She wants to raise her children. She doesn’t want to have to leave her very young children without their mother/p pWhen Nora was finished, he said nothing, the woman from Every Mother is a Working Mother repeated her question./p p“ Well, my interest in all of this is what happens to the kids. Ten years ago I went to Alaska to convince the Native-American mothers to not use formula or sugar water which was rotting their children’s teeth and to continue to breast feed. So I am fully aware of the importance of breast feeding and the importance of staying with the mother as long as possible..”/p p“ I am a mother that is trying to go to college...When are you going to support that?” A mother from Low-Income Families Empowerment Through Education (LIFETIME) asked. She continued, “ I need to get my degree, I am struggling but I will get it because I have to. And when I do, my children will be so proud when they see their mother walking down that aisle with her degree. But why do you make it so hard for folks to go to school on welfare? Not every one is as strong as me and they just give up when they are constantly faced with obstacles. I will get it even if you do sanction me.”/p p“ You see... You will get it no matter what.. that’s what we’re saying is that people can do things if they really want to, with or without welfare,” responded Wade. At that point, one of the suits flanking Wade’s right side lunged into the conversation, his name tag read CLARENCE CARTER./p p“ Well, guess what, “ I cried unable to stand it any longer, “ I have a sixth grade education and I am one of those people who got stopped by welfare, as several of the folks that we work with at POOR do—so I want to know, why doesn’t welfare to work mean JOB CREATION, in other words, really WELFARE to WORK for folks who have substance abuse, mental health and other issues that make it hard for them to find work?”/p p“Well, that’s up to the states, we can’t force them to do that” /p p.“ That’s not true. You can make it policy on the federal level,” I insisted./p p“I think its very important to help people get into jobs.” He looked at his aides./p p“So when will you meet with all of us for a REAL listening session?” someone from the back shouted to him./p p“Yeah. When can we meet to really talk?” another person shouted out of the crowd./p pHe looked down and then up, his aides motioned him to go./p p“Well, I’ve got to go.” He started moving backwards, toward the hotel./p p“ But when can we meet? Let’s set a date to actually listen to folks —to talk and to figure some of this out!” We all shouted to him./p p“ Sure, I’ll do that, “ he replied to easily./p p“But when can you commit to a date?” we continued to ask./p p“I will commit to the process—I am not sure when or where.” He looked down at the last sentence, his words becoming faint memories of political doublespeak, fading into the pillars of shining hotel glass.br / /p/p.“/td/tr/td/tr/table/div/p
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  • You Better Open Your Eyes

    09/24/2021 - 11:35 by Anonymous (not verified)
    Original Author
    root
    Original Body
    pstrongIT’s Your Business:Men’s March To stop Domestic Violence /strong/p pDIV align="left" TABLE cellpadding="5"TR VALIGN="TOP"TDIMG SRC= "../sites/default/files/arch_img/553/photo_1_supplement.jpg" //td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TDTR VALIGN="TOP"TD pby Isabel Estrada/p pThe prevalent message at iIt's Your Business/i, an event organized by the Family Violence Prevention Fund in cooperationbr / with the Maxine Hall Health center, insisted that the issue of domestic violence is the entirebr / community's responsibility. For this reason the focus of the march andbr / meeting was not only on the victims but also very much on the perpetratorsbr / and the entire community./p pI arrived at the Third Baptist Church on Pierce and MacAllister, where thebr / march was to begin at 12 o'clock, feeling slightly awkward in a predominantlybr / male, African-American group. However, I was soon reassured. Everybody wasbr / smiling and I was immediately introduced to Reverend Lazanius Johnson, whobr / would be the main speaker. The group was small, about 35 people in all. Mostly men as well as some women and adorable children lead the march.br / One small boy wearing a red sweatshirt held a sign that read iBrother's andbr / Sisters, Let's Talk About It, There's No Excuse for Abuse/i. However, thebr / size of the group seemed to have no affect on the strength of the message. /p pAs we walked down Pierce towards our destination, the Fillmore Mini Park, ourbr / voices emanated a loud and powerful chant, "It's Your Business. It's ourbr / Business. Stop Domestic Violence." I laughed as I noticed one man staring wide-eyed and open-mouthed from hisbr / Victorian house as we passed. Another White man in full army fatigues didn'tbr / seem to notice what was going on until a member of our group handed him abr / blue and white "There's NO Excuse for Domestic Violence" bumper sticker,br / calling him brother as he did so. As we passed more people in the Western Addition a fewbr / kids looked at us as if we were crazy, but then a woman started clapping tobr / our rhythm from across the street as we passed. /p pWhen we arrived at the mini park, more people converged. As the time went bybr / they seemed to get younger. Before beginning, Reverend Johnson urged folks tobr / step forward, breaking any tension there might have been by saying, "Come awaybr / from the tables, ain't nobody going to take the food." He blessed God,br / Allah, Buddha and any other deity that stands for peace and love. He thenbr / led the group in singing the iNegro National Anthem/i. The anthem holds abr / powerful message and assures that the past is not forgotten, especially inbr / the second verse./p p i Stony the road we trod,br / br /Bitter the chastening rod,br / br / Felt in the days when hope unborn had died;br / br / Yet with steady beat,br / br /Have not our weary feetbr / br /Come to the place for which our fathers sighed?br / br /We have come over a way that with tears have been watered,br / br /We have come, treading our path through the blood of the slaughtered,br / br /Out from the gloomy past,br / br /Till now we stand at lastbr / br /Where the white gleam of our bright star is cast. /i/p pLinda Mack Burch, who organized the entire event, spoke next. She again madebr / the point that in order to conquer domestic violence, people cannot simply bebr / focused on their own problems, but must take the initiative for the entirebr / community. She spoke confidently while making quick gestures, "It takes abr / village, we are a village, to stop domestic violence." As even more peoplebr / arrived, Ms. Burch made her frustration concerning the excessive violence inbr / all forms in her community apparent. "We are tired," she calls out. /p pThebr / next speaker, Matty Scott, continued in the same vein and further insistedbr / that violence was an issue that seriously needed to be addressed by thebr / African-American community. She stated that it wasn't the police who neededbr / to intervene, the community needed to unite to handle its own problems./p pWhen Eddy Moor from RSVP spoke he insisted that "it's all aboutbr / accountability." He felt that as long as people continue to blame their ownbr / violence on others, or on the situation they find themselves in, violence would notbr / end. He made it clear that in an abusive relationship, it is not only thebr / victim's responsibility to seek help, but also the abuser's. /p pA silence fell upon the crowd as the reverend asked if there was anyonebr / willing to share their own experiences with abuse. For awhile everyonebr / seemed to exude discomfort, including myself. /p pI immediately began to questionbr / what exactly constituted abuse. I have never been in a physically abusivebr / relationship, but does that mean that I have never been abused? When I wasbr / ten-years-old I went out with a nineteen-year-old who had been sexuallybr / abused by a woman when he was a little boy. Many would think that just thebr / difference in age was bad for me. But there were other issues. Takingbr / advantage of my naiveté and the fact that I was still very much scared ofbr / ghosts, seriously, he constantly lied to me and often tried to make me feelbr / scared. I'm not exactly sure what qualifies as abuse but I know that when hebr / left, I was completely devastated by and ashamed of our relationship. It'sbr / odd how it would take me this long (seven years) and a march against domesticbr / abuse to question whether I too may have been a victim of emotional abuse. /p pSince I don't often like to think about this relationship, in which I wasbr / never hurt physically, I can certainly see how shame and denial plays a hugebr / part in the fact that battered women often go years without ever seekingbr / help. /p pWell, one woman had the courage to approach the microphone. I recognized herbr / as one of the first women who had welcomed me with a smile at the beginningbr / of the march. She started out by saying, "I thank the Lord for thisbr / community." She then proceeded to tell us of how she had been abused forbr / 12 years by her brother and then for four years by her ex-boyfriend. "Ibr / used to hate my brother," she said, "But God showed me that something wasbr / wrong with him." Shouts of agreements arose as she continued, "Thebr / perpetrators have been abused also." She then told us of how her brother,br / before he had died of cancer had asked only that she forgive him. Bybr / forgiving him, she was able to take the position of power that she had so beenbr / deprived of. /p pShe continued talking about violence in general in thebr / African-American community and stated, "We can't let society pit us againstbr / each other." As many of the other speakers had done, she was emphasizingbr / that the African-American community had to take care of itself. It seemsbr / that when the law steps in, it only means more violence. /p pAgain, the reverend took the stage but this time he spoke more directly to allbr / of us. "You are all black queens, you are all queens and you need to bebr / treated as such," his voice boomed. Shouts of acknowledgment grew from ourbr / throats. I really did feel proud to be a woman as he spoke those words. Hebr / then cast away any distant air he may have had as a respected reverend andbr / began talking directly to those who were not attending the event. "You can'tbr / sell no more dope on the corner," he shouted menacingly over and over againbr / directly to a group of young men huddled on the corner. The whole audiencebr / participated, echoing what the reverend would say. "We're going to get allbr / the crack people into institutions," he shouted. He doesn't just want to getbr / rid of people; he wants to help them. The reverend maintained that a greatbr / deal of the violence was due to "people closing their eyes." He made itbr / clear that ending violence not only in the Western Addition but in some sensebr / the whole world, was everybody's responsibility. /p p/pPNext, a tall, big man approached the stage. He too had earlier been at the marchbr / and I had noticed that his voice had been louder than all the others.br / He was the gospel rap artist Bigg E. Through his music he told the storybr / of how finding religion had lifted him out of being a dope addict on thebr / street. "I went from selling dope to smoking dope. I couldn't find a way outbr / until I found the Lord Jesus Christ." /p pThis was a very religious crowd so thebr / praise rang high. "All I want to do is live a righteous life, get my Jesusbr / on, keep it real, keep it right." One set of lyrics that I foundbr / particularly interesting exemplified a difference in the methods of religionbr / practiced by African-Americans as opposed to others. "Ain't no party like abr / Holy Ghost party 'cause a Holy Ghost party don't stop." /p pWhen I asked the reverend what had prompted this march he mentioned how hisbr / sister had died of breast cancer and how a local community member named Mariebr / had been stabbed 20 times by her partner. Both incidents had occurred inbr / the past year, making him think it a good time to bring the communitybr / together to create a base of support. As I left, the festivities continuedbr / and I could hear the strong, soulful voice of a woman singing jazz as Ibr / waited for the 22 Fillmore bus./p pLately I have been learning about some aspects of African-American culture.br / Mainly I Have been learning about how African-Americans have generally grown up in a morebr / community based system of eldership in which it is everyone's responsibilitybr / to care for and discipline those younger than them. Western culture tends tobr / put emphasis on being separated. I have often seen White parents get mad ifbr / anyone else attempts to discipline their child. This event certainly attestsbr / to the fact that a great number of African-Americans in the Westernbr / Addition have a desire to care for their entire community. They don't wantbr / to just allow people to get carted off to prison or to allow people to do asbr / they wish behind closed doors. They want everybody to participate in creatingbr / a safer and more peaceful environment. The reverend had no problem yellingbr / out at those standing on the corner because he most likely feels asbr / responsible for them as he may feel for his own child. /p pThis was an inspiring event. I wish that our whole society would take thebr / example of this African-American community and start caring for everyonebr / else, regardless of any actual family ties, as though we were all related tobr / each other as brothers, sisters, daughters, sons, mothers and fathers. Thebr / message again: IT'S YOUR BUSINESS, IT'S OUR BUSINESS, STOP DOMESTIC VIOLENCE!/p pIf you or anyone you know is being abused physically or emotionally pleasebr / seek help by calling 1 (800) 799-SAFE (Family Violence Prevention Fund). Somebr / resources for men who batter include, Manalive (415) 979-5933, Men'sbr / Hotline (24-hour) (415) 924-1070 and MOVE (415) 777-4496.br / /p/td/tr/td/tr/table/div/p
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  • stop police brutality

    09/24/2021 - 11:35 by Anonymous (not verified)
    Original Author
    root
    Original Body
    pstrongThe October 22nd Coalition leads annual event in Oakland/strong/p pDIV align="left" TABLE cellpadding="5"TR VALIGN="TOP"TDIMG SRC= "../sites/default/files/arch_img/554/photo_1_supplement.jpg" //td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TDTR VALIGN="TOP"TD pby Dae-Han Song/PoorNewsNetwork/p pBeneath patchy, gray skies and atop a simple platform, stood a dozen people holding in their hands pictures of deceased loved ones. Under each picture were the name and the date on which the person had been killed. /p pOn this day, October 22nd, 2001, family members of police brutality victims came in solidarity with other like families to support each other and decry police brutality. In the words of Jose Silva with the Youth Student Network, one of the lead organizers of the event, "The purpose of this event was for family members to come in solidarity....Most of the time we are shut out and October 22nd gives us that day to express our voices." Jose Silva's connection to police brutality became very personal when his brother, Danny Ray Lopez, had been shot and killed by 53 gunshots from the Denver, Colorado police./p pIn fact, many of the activists involved were personally affected by police brutality. Loni Amaya, one of the people on stage, held a picket sign with the picture of the late Chila Amaya. Family members, fearing for the safety of Chila Amaya as she held a knife in a distraught state, after problems with her boyfriend, called the police for assistance in getting her some psychological and mental help. When police arrived, they stood behind a locked screen door and told family members to go to another room. As Chila Amaya turned around with her knife to see where her family members were going, the commanding officer gave the order to open fire. What had started out as a call for assistance to prevent Chila from hurting herself had tragically turned into her death. In response to police brutality, Loni Amaya admits that "there are good cops out there, but there are also bad ones....a lot of the time police abuse their power when they don't need to."/p pIn a nation where one out of every three African-American males spend some time in the prison system, it is no surprise that many of the victims of police brutality are African-American males. However, this did not prevent an ethnically mixed audience from coming to the event, as many realized the commonality of their experiences. As Yuri Kochiyama stated, police brutality is just another in a string of terrorist attacks against people of color in a history of lynchings, slavery, the taking of Mexican land, the Chinese Exclusion Act and the internment of Japanese-Americans./p pThe long-term goal of the demonstration was to address police brutality not as a one-time event, but as one that happens continually and one that needs institutionalized change. In the words of Jose Silva, "Our long-term goal is that we want a national platform so that police brutality will be recognized everyday."br / /p/td/tr/td/tr/table/div/p
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  • A Fake Life

    09/24/2021 - 11:35 by Anonymous (not verified)
    Original Author
    root
    Original Body
    pstrongThe Story of David, a youth in and out of the criminal justice system since he was 12 years old. /strong/p pDIV align="left" TABLE cellpadding="5"TR VALIGN="TOP"TDIMG SRC= "../sites/default/files/arch_img/555/photo_1_supplement.jpg" //td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TDTR VALIGN="TOP"TD pby Isabel Estrada/Youth in the Media Intern/p pbMoney, Family, Respect/b /p p"Has anybody in here actually been to Juvenile Hall?" asked the facilitator of a workshop concerning the juvenile justice system, at the Upset the Setup Youth Conference on Saturday, August 29, 2001. The Latino with long curly hair and glasses—his 6-foot, 1-inch, 160-pound body spilling out of the small school desk—raised his hand. /p pTo me he didn't look like the "type" who would have been through Juvenile Hall. He seemed too quiet and well behaved and spoke with a sweet and innocent voice. I think he noticed that I was staring at him and felt slightly perturbed. I was just thinking that I needed to talk with him. When the class was over, I followed him around for awhile and when I finally got up my nerve to speak, I asked him for an interview. He didn't seem particularly enthusiastic but at least he was willing./p pI was expecting the story of a reformed youth. It's odd how things are never as simple as they first appear. I was speaking with a boy who was as intelligent and, in his own way, as caring as I. However, because of the completely distinct conditions in which we grew up, we have very different views on life. I feel as though I have a vague, universal, but undeveloped caring for all people. David cares as well, but he cares exclusively for his "own"—his family and friends, the ones who are, in turn, prepared to support him if he needs it. /p pWhile I think that only necessity justifies stealing. David used to see it this way: "If someone's gonna rob out of my pockets then I'm gonna return the favor, pretty much." Now that he has a job and a slightly less chaotic life he says, "If it's there and I have the opportunity then yeah. But I don't go out and go to a store and rob it. It's not valuable just for your own conscience to go out and take from another person, but if you're ignorant enough to trust people at a party then you're just asking to get robbed. If you're hard-headed enough then you're just asking to get robbed." /p p"Money ain't nothing, I can give it away and shit. But I still want it, you know, desire it. If you ain't got money you ain't got nothing." While David was trying to act as though money doesn't matter to him in this statement, in the end he ended up completely contradicting himself. I think that he in fact puts great emphasis on the role of money in his life. Not only for basic survival but also for how he feels about himself. /ppMy immediate reaction to this statement has made me aware of what I will now call "privileged idealism". I would never make a statement similar to David's in which so much importance was placed on money. I don't like the thought of giving great value to material possessions. /p pBut here's the catch. As David pointed out, I've never been forced to steal, go hungry or sleep in a shelter. This means that I am not in a position to dispute David's statement because I've never been truly without money; I've never been made to feel that "I ain't got nothin'". And in this society, not having money can change these words easily to "I ain't nothing". Society says: because you don't have money you are nothing and therefore you deserve nothing. The fact that he has felt at one point that he didn't have anything in the whole world, and the fact that I really haven't been made to feel this way is just another factor in how we have come to be such different people./p pWhen David was 10 years old his mother died in a train accident. Hebr / remembers circling the neighborhood to tell all the Jehovah Witnesses. "I love her to death," he says. David tells me about his life nonchalantly, in an assertive tone, his voice only dropping to just above a whisper when he speaks of his mother. /p pBefore she died, David had a premonition. "I just seen like a figment of my imagination. Before I knew, I ran home. I cut class and I just needed to get home. I just think its gonna happen and it happens. Oh fuck, my first feeling was excitement, [but] not like I was happy. A sense of fear but pleasure at the same time, it doesn't happen everyday, that's like big news. Something you could tell your friends for days." He pauses. "If I get down too deep your gonna have me in my bed crying," David tells me with an ironic laugh. It was around the time of his mother's death that he started getting into real confrontations. If anyone dared to insult his mother there would be a fight. That was understood. /p pDavid's father was jailed for bank robbery and hasn't seen his son in 8 years. David tells me that, "To be a bank robber you have to be brilliant,br / you have to be smart". In a matter of minutes you can either accrue 20 thousand dollars or 20 years in jail. His philosophy is, if you are prepared to pay the consequences of failure then it's a good risk to take, otherwise you're just being stupid. David says that the reason most robbers start getting caught is due to their greed for the "thrill". The thrill may be that of having people screaming on the ground, or of being chased, but in any case it eventually begins to cloud their senses, thus leading to their final downfall. /p pWhen his mom died, David moved to Modesto to live with his aunt whose sons were members of the gang Norteños. By the time he was twelve he was cutting school to hang out and drink beer with his friends. When David and his cousins jumped another boy and David’s aunt found out about it, she blamed David for negatively influencing her sons and sent him to his other aunt. As the latter was having financial problems and already had three boys of her own, she decided to send David to a shelter back in San Jose. There he was reunited with old friends from the Southside. /p pBoth David and I experienced somewhat chaotic childhood. I too, had an absent father. I had to learn how to be very responsible at a young age as I was the only person who could help my mother succeed in making our lives function. I also lived through a horribly alienating experience at a private middle school. I believe that in many ways these types of experiences while growing up serve to make a person more flexible when faced with life's abundant uncertainties. /p pHowever, the big difference between David’s and my life arose where our mothers are concerned. My mother is the only person who provides me with unconditional support. If I had lost mine, especially at such a young age, I can't say that I wouldn't be the interviewee speaking about an adolescence spent fluctuating between the streets and Juvenile Hall./p pDavid's first extended experience with Juvenile Hall arose because of a crime he didn't commit. It all started one charged night. David and his friends were hanging out when one of them noticed his girlfriend making out with another man. Except for David, perhaps because he was only fourteen, the whole group jumped the man, beating him severely. David took part after the man was beaten by stripping him of all his clothing and leaving him naked in a public park. /p pAs far as David is concerned, he deserved what he got because he was a friend of the girl's boyfriend. One thing lead to another and David ended up being charged with assault even though he hadn't truly participated in beating the man. He decided to take some of the blame because he knew that if he split up the time of the sentence with his friends it would be a less serious charge for all of them. /p pDavid, now 18, has been to Juvenile Hall 13 times since he was 14. He has a tattoo of SideShow Bob from The Simpsons on his upper left arm, and a Pisces sign on his right arm, the words “San Jose” on his left forearm and his mother's name scrawled across his chest. When I expressed surprise that he was a Pisces—the sign of the dreamer—he assured me that he truly was dreamy and sensitive./p pJuvenile Hall's B5—B for boys, 5 for the hall unit—is made up of 26 rooms with 13 on each side of a long, impersonal hall. The front desk, a watchful presence, is centered at the furthest wall, next to another meeting room with stacks of chairs and, "If it's cool it has a ping pong table," says David. "When I first entered into Juvenile Hall I was cold, nervous, scared. I felt contained. I wasn't scared, I ain't scared of nothing [but] it was really big. I felt like I was right at home. I was just alone. No one talked to me, it was just distant. I was happy. I felt like wow, don't mess with me, I'm hard, I been to Juvenile Hall. To people who haven't been there you're dangerous, you're a menace to society. [That night] I didn't go to sleep." /p pFor the most part, David didn't get along with the other kids and constantly got into fights. "It's a trust issue. I don't trust nobody. I don't trust another man, I don't even trust females, but I trust females more than dudes. I'd rather be hurt inside than hurt outside cause I don't want no one to think I'm weak, because I'm not weak. 'Cause if they think I'm weak then I'm gonna have to prove I'm not weak." /p pHe says that the smart kids who want to "take care of business" get along with the counselors. In return for their more respectful behavior they can get away with more things and sometimes even have their sentences lessened. It's the "lops" (lopsided kids) who get along well with the other inmates because they are constantly trying to show off. These are the ones who get into the most trouble and often have their time extended. "They're punks, they ain't nothing." David says that they also tend to snitch on other kids. Though the counselors don't generally respect them, they listen to them anyway. /p pIn Juvenile Hall David wasn't allowed to have a roommate because of hisbr / explosive temper. "There's this fool, he was my roommate in Juvenile Hall. I was sittin’ in my bed and he was saying shit. He got on my nerves a little too much, and you know we're hotheaded. He grabbed me, then I grabbed him by the hair, I pulled him down and his head hit the side of the wall and I hit him like 15 times. Naw I was over-exaggerating, it was like four times. He's sitting there talking shit. I had to do what I gotta do. I laid in my bed and stayed awake all night 'cause I ain't about to let no other man rise up on me, put hands on me while I'm asleep. " /p pLockdown: B1 and B2; these are the high security halls, often housing convicted murderers and rapists. Attacking a counselor is another reason you might be sent there. David, on the other hand, didn't have to commit any serious crime in order to be assigned to B2, where he was housed simply because the other halls were filled. "I was on C level. You're in your room all the time, 23 .5 hours in your room." Again, if a boy maintains a good relationship with the counselors it is possible to bend the rules. Sometimes David was allowed to go to the weight room, meaning he would spend three hours outside of the cell and 21 inside, a slight improvement over the previous figures. /p p "I been to the hospital [in Juvenile Hall], too," David announces to me after a moment of silence. When he was still 14 years old he cussed out one of his Hall counselors. "Counselors ain't nothing better than us, they just got jobs. They're making their money, if you ain't got money you ain't got nothing." /p p/pPThat same night he found himself transferred into a room with what is called a D-Risk. These are boys who, according to David are supposed to be given rooms alone because they display homosexual tendencies. David says that they were playing cards on the top bunk, when there was a sudden pounding on the door. As David turned around to see a counselor standing at the door, the 18-year-old D-Risk slammed his fist into David's head, making him fall off the bunk bed and crash into the floor. /p pThe counselor just stood and watched as the older boy "beat the shit" out of David. Finally the counselor, who was a friend of the one who had been cussed out, opened the door, saying he hadn't known if they were really fighting or just playing around. David believes that if the door hadn't been opened at that moment, he might have been beaten to death./p pDavid spent much of his adolescence locked up, his incarcerations ranged from 2 weeks for getting drunk at group home, to ten months for beating someone up. His time there was mostly passed sleeping, reading, writing letters to his friends and making phone calls. /p pA great deal of what David did was simply out of a desire for money or entertainment. One night David and a few of his friends were just "chillin’" drunk. "Man, I feel like having some money," blurted out a friend./p p"Fuck, let's do this shit," was David's response. They all decided to rob a few cars in the neighborhood. In their first heist David got only 20 dollars and 15 CDs. /p pEverything seemed to be running smoothly until they heard, "Get on the ground," yelled by a cop running out of an apartment pointing a gun at the boys. One friend was so drunk that when he attempted to run, his feet just wouldn't move. The cop grabbed this boy's head and slammed it into the ground while pointing the gun at a different boy. This kid had just frozen in place, wide eyed, because of the mixture of alcohol with pure fright. /p pAs the policeman continued to yell at the boy to get down, David took his chance and began running as fast as he could. "As I was running the only thing going through my mind is: which way am I going to go next." Apparently he made the right choice because he got away. As far as David is concerned, he's never really been caught in his life. Ten of the times he just stayed on the scene because he didn't feel like running and the other three he turned himself in. He believes that no matter what, he will not get caught unless he chooses to. /p pWhen I chuckled at his arrogance, David started getting mad at me for laughing when he hadn't made a joke. When I apologized, he became very serious and responded: " Don't apologize, where I come from if you apologize all the time it just makes you look weak." I returned that I didn't care about seeming weak, I simply didn't want to offend him. Again he repeated that he didn't like me laughing if he hadn't made a joke. At that point I became slightly annoyed. I'm sure he was well aware that I already felt very naive in the face of all his experiences. But when he saw that I wasn't going to stand for him trying to push his own code of behavior onto me, he was the one who said "sorry" and explained that I must have had an influence on him. David likes to say that the only difference between us is that he was taught how to manipulate people at an early age. I think in a way that he may be right. /p p"Family's the most important thing to me. I could be the worst fuck up in the world and she [his cousin] would still back me up," says David. When one of his seven sisters was raped he decided to exact retribution himself. David carried a knife around with him wherever he went. When he saw the rapist in an alleyway, he couldn't control himself. He took out his knife and stabbed him, ripping out his lower stomach. He remembers that his whole head was trembling as he brought the knife into the man's flesh. All he could feel was the hate that was consuming his entire body. /p pWhen the man fell, David ran. He doesn't know how he got out of the alley but he does remember thebr / strange feeling he had as he made his way to a friend's house. He saw the people walking and cars rolling by as though nothing had happened. "Does anybody know?" the silence of the day, and the mid-afternoon light made him wonder. David was 15 years old. /p pAs far as David is concerned, the point of life is "to live and die". Hebr / says you can either make money, fight and do whatever you want or you can lead a fake life. The fake life is having a job, protecting your family, having a nice little house and car and "going out once a month". He also says that your life is over after thirty. Still, David continually brings up his dream of meeting a nice "female" and having kids. He tells me that when that occurs he'll just dedicate himself to caring for them and stop getting into trouble./p pCurrently David teaches and mentors physically and mentally disabled kids at a local high school. His duties range from helping to calm down nervous, distracted or violent teenagers to changing their diapers. Some of the kids are high functioning while others have two-year-old IQ's. "I love my kids. I have a one-on-one with one of my students named Richard. In a way he's like me because he just needs some guidance and to be taught. He just needs a way out. I need a way out to make my life better." /p pWhat I am internalizing after this interview is a strong sense that I cannot judge someone else's life or actions based on mine. In the end the choices you make must correspond with what life sets in front of you and your choices are going to vary as a direct result of what life has prepared you for. A main reason why I have not done many of the things that David has is not because of morals or beliefs but because I did not grow up with people constantly challenging me. I did not grow up lacking formal education or job opportunities. My life has never been threatened. Essentially, it is impossible to judge another person fairly because you've only lived your life and not theirs. /p p"I wanna do something with my life but for now it's just all about my homies downtown, in a way I might be stupid but I still got love for the block [an area of downtown San Jose]." I could hear pride in David's voice when he told me that he was now renting his own apartment. When I asked why he chose to live in a dangerous neighborhood where the threat of running into problems with the law is always imminent, he said that it made sense to live in a dangerous neighborhood because that is where he had grown up. However, not everything is just the same, "I trust people now, a certain few, I trust my boys."br / /p/td/tr/td/tr/table/div/p
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  • 21st Century Kids

    09/24/2021 - 11:35 by Anonymous (not verified)
    Original Author
    root
    Original Body
    pstrong pbAs voiced in a Popularbr / cartoon. Sept.11, 2001.br //b/p pSuicide Bombersbr / highjacking Americanbr / Commerical planes. /p pGave both 20th Cenury Adultsbr / and 21st Cenury Children.br //p pb"A SHOCK TO THEIR SYSTEM."/b/p/strong/p pDIV align="left" TABLE cellpadding="5"TR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TDTR VALIGN="TOP"TD pby Joe B./p p21st Century kids got it rough!br / "I ain't no goat, grup." See what I mean, born in the mid to late 1980's going through grade and highschool hell, guns, drugs, drive by'sbr / b[hearing or being shot from moving cars, motorcycles, skateboards even]/b and just when things cannot get anyworse BOOOOOM-September 11, 2001's New York's World Trade Center's Twin Towers get rammed into and falls in a hellish consuming fire leaving black, gray, smoke and thousands of dead in the rubble./p pTheir parent's are tramatized many being closer to them than they ever could imagine./p pTheir older brother's, sister's, friends joining the military or being called to active duty - already some have died in accidents, or from enemy fire lands people didn't have a clue about until... That Day!/p pMan, its' 'Freakin hard to be a Twenty First Century Child./p pBut these youngsters have something that other generations didn't have perspective and history of every conflict across the planet, the internet, revised his/hersory books, real documentary footage of those wars as they were fought and generations behind them, who can tell them the truth of those past conflicts./p pI believe these 21C's though traumatized now will come out the other end stronger, smarter, more compassionate, stable, and unfortunately know that they are mortal and that real immortality is coming and ending war before its apon them may be what sets them apart from the generations before them.br //p pThe World War1- 1914-1918 'Gens known as the lost generation because so young, "The Cream" or best were killed, maimed, psychologically crippled it took a long time to recover especially from Great Britain, Germany, France, Australia, and Russia.br / /p pThen World War11 1938-1945 where our grand mother's, fathers, grandfathers, older friends, siblings fought, died, were wounded, and survived.br / /p pIn 1946-1964 "The Baby Boom" Generation was born./p pKorea in 1950 is called "A police action" yet Communist Chinese and American soldier's in uniform died in this conlict; sounds awfully like a war to me.br //p p Then Viet Nam Conflict, and Israel's "Three Day War" in 1967. /p pNotice that a battle lasting less than a week is considered at war. /p p Desert Storm/Shield in 1991./p pI'm sure many facts were wrong, errors in dates, times, history./p pSo study them, ask your parents, grandparent, older siblings, or friends or a group of your best buds, home girls, 'bro's - 'sista's as something to do apart from school, study hall, video games, tv, radio, cd/dvd listening, drug or conventional 'part-ay-ing down./p pThis is the best and worst of time 'youngins-learn from it. /p pWho is this goof on-line? If you are still reading then I've made some sense; oh, I'm just joe-I don't a lot of things but learning about things seems to be my knack. /p pThough I'm rotten at math which is one thing I like to learn. /p pYou see to know Chemistry you must know some math. That's my bane of existance - not knowing enough math to learn chemistry which my personal long term goal./p pAny of you geniuses or adverage brained youngsters know any ways of ridding one's self of Math Phobia? I'd really like to know./p pIts the only way I know to become a 21C Alchemist already missed being a 20C one. Oh well better late than never. Bye./p pPlease donate what can to br /Poor Magazine orbr /C/0 Ask /ppJoe at 255 9th St.br / br /Street, San Francisco, CA. 94103 USA/p pFor Joe only my snailbr / br /mail:PO Box 1230 #645br / br /Market St.San Francisco, /ppCA 94102br /Email:askjoe@poormagazine. org./p p/p/td/tr/td/tr/table/div/p
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  • Letter to JoAnn McGuckin

    09/24/2021 - 11:35 by Anonymous (not verified)
    Original Author
    root
    Original Body
    pstrongJoAnn McGuckin lost custody of all six children Friday, July 13, 2001. The state has permanent custody- what will happen to JoAnn the mother without her children?/strong/p p/p pDIV align="left" TABLE cellpadding="5"TR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TDTR VALIGN="TOP"TD pby PNN Staff/p pTo: JoAnn McGuckin- PERSONALbr /br / From: Dee @ POOR Magazinebr /br / Re: YOU ARE A MOTHER!!!YOU ARE A HERO - DUE TO THE SIMPLE FACT THAT YOU HAVE GIVEN LIFE TO SEVEN CHILDREN!!!!!/p pDear Ms. McGuckin,/p pThis is our second letter to you and your children. What we are hearing in the news about you is making us very angry./p pThe news reports say your children have been taken into "protective custody" and given to three families./p pThe children are reported to be healthy and well – yet you are in jail for "felony neglect" – FOR WHAT??/p pWe as a society are guilty of "felony neglect"- we and your neighbors, townspeople, and the judge that handed down that charge./p pWhere were that judge and townfolk when you were struggling to care for your ill husband through his death while also caring for your children?/p pThey are guilty of "neglect" for not supporting you emotionally when your husband passed away./p pThat judge is not aware of your struggle or is just a plain misogynist. /p pYou are a mother!! Instead of a criminal sentence you should be receiving an award ./p pSeven children- all healthy; they are all so desirable that three families want them./p pWell, how did those kids become so desirable – because you and your husband- and especially you- cared for them and raised them well./p pCounty Social Workers in child Protective Services for the most part are trained to blame the parents and remove the children from the parents. /p pAll you need is some time, crisis counseling and an in-home care provider and some financial support – food stamps, rent subsidy, an attorney that believes in parental rights and perhaps some training in computer technology or another field that you might like and could make some money in to help support your family./p pYou have been carrying a very heavy burden and yet your children are all well. I am a social worker and a therapist and I am giving you advice based on much experience in my field (and personal experience as a mother )./p pDO NOT BE A VICTIM HERE- DO NOT LET THESE PEOPLE BLAME YOU– DON"T LET THEM BREAK UP YOUR FAMLY!!!/p pTHEY want to care about your children- what about you?? They need to care for you!! /p pYou are the children’s mother!! You gave life to 7 children. You are a HERO!!! These people did not help you in your struggle to raise these children, in your crisis, in your pain- they are the only ones guilty of felony neglect!!/p pRespectfully, /p pDee Gray, M.S.W., M.F.T.br /br / Co-editor, POOR Magazine/p pLisa Gray-Garcia (daughter of Dee )br /br / Co-editor, POOR Magazine /p pPS: We believe what you need first is a rest. Someone needs to donate a trip for you for 3 or 4 days to a resort. Then another trip for you and your children to Acapulco, Mexico, or any other place that has an ocean, for a week to swim, scuba dive, and build sand castles./p p/p/td/tr/td/tr/table/div/p
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  • Caught Up in this System

    09/24/2021 - 11:35 by Anonymous (not verified)
    Original Author
    root
    Original Body
    pDIV align="left" TABLE cellpadding="5"TR VALIGN="TOP"TDIMG SRC= "../sites/default/files/arch_img/530/photo_1_supplement.jpg" //td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TDTR VALIGN="TOP"TD pby Mari/p pSee, I'm caught up in this system that's made to bring down you and I. br /br / This system is made to oppress our people till the day we die. br /br / This system is called... br /br / EDUCATION! br /br / That's right I said it, EDUCATION! br /br / Where we learn that Columbus sailed the Ocean blue in 1492, but did youbr /br / know he and his men RAPED, KILLED, and STOLE from human beings like mebr /br / and you! br /br / This system forces me to go to a class where my people are put down, br /br / disrespected, and made to look like dirt. br /br / This is where I learn that we are the immigrants of this so-called country, br /br / and about how we crossed the border, well you know what? WE didn't crossbr /br / the border, the border crossed us! br /br / Is this America? NO, this is turtle island! br /br / How could this land be named after someone who is not even from here! br /br / So I stand up and say, Fuck this educational system, and the whole US of A!br / /p/td/tr/td/tr/table/div/p
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  • Shelter Beat #5

    09/24/2021 - 11:35 by Anonymous (not verified)
    Original Author
    root
    Original Body
    pstrongSo I left with no socks on…br / The day the “rules” stood stillbr / /strong/p pDIV align="left" TABLE cellpadding="5"TR VALIGN="TOP"TDIMG SRC= "../sites/default/files/arch_img/542/photo_1_supplement.jpg" //td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TDTR VALIGN="TOP"TD pby Micheal Morgan/p pI spent the day of Friday, October 19, 2001 writing at POOR Magazine, along with staff writer Joseph Bolden, who can attest to the fact that while over there I was not doing any drugs, drinking, wielding knives or screaming (at least not while he was watching)./p pAfter returning to my shelter (Episcopal Sanctuary) from POOR Magazine—I had been up since 6am, the time the shelter staff wake us up for breakfast, and had worked at POOR all day long—I took a shower, ate dinner, and was lying on my bunk reading. At some point a monitor started yelling in the hall (they don't know how to talk in a regular voice) that there was an AA meeting upstairs. I yelled to them, "Is this a meeting for the hearing impaired?". /p pThen, with no warning, a small, very hyper, young woman burst into the men's area and said, "There's an AA meeting upstairs". She completely invaded our privacy and broke the rule that says that women have to announce themselves before entering the men's area. But, she was probably trying to set me up since I'd gone to the Human Rights Commission concerning the Sanctuary earlier that week. /p pI said: "You aren't supposed to come back here without making an announcement first. Besides that, we already heard the announcement."/p pShe said, "I did announce myself". All the men in the area responded that she had not made an announcement. Then she noticed a pair of scissors I had lying out which I use to trim my beard and said, "It's against the rules for you to have those and I'm going to write you up." /p pI said, “Go ahead, but get out of the men's area because you aren't supposed to be here unless you've announced yourself, which you did not, and now your business is over here.”/p pSo, an otherwise peaceful night had taken a bad turn due to an overzealous child who perhaps just wanted to have a glance at the men in states of undress. For, you see, even if she had made an announcement, she rushed into the room, without attempting to get a reply from the men that it was okay to come back there (which is the reason for making the announcement. Making the announcement and then just barging in would render the announcement meaningless)./p pIt was either a set-up or it was a violation of the Rules of Conduct in relation to women entering the men's area, or it was the result of an overzealous young staff member. The scissors had very little to do with anything. It is a rule that you are supposed to check in scissors but staff has seen me cutting my beard with them many times and the scissors would not have been lying out on my bed if I had intended them as a concealed weapon. The scissors were not a concealed weapon since they were: 1) not concealed, and 2) used for beard trimming (not stabbing people)/p pThen, I was told to go outside the shelter because violation of the rules regarding a weapon was grounds for expulsion for the night. So, I went outside. /p pWithin a few minutes the young woman came out there and said something to me. I said, "You didn't announce yourself on our floor"./p p/pPTo which she replied, "I did." I started to tell her something and she just walked off./p p So I said, “I'm not through talking to you,"./p pAt the same time she was saying, "Well I'm through talking to you". I guess contrary opinions are not worth their time./p pThis kind of walking away while a client is talking is rude but is part of their modus operandi of not having to listen to "us" because they are supposed to do all the talking. Later, I said to her, “You are not above the law."br / She replied, "I am the law.”/p pTo which I replied, "You aren't the law. You're just a worker here. You're a slave"./p pAfter stepping outside of door next to the front desk of the shelter you find yourself in a sort of waiting room where you can address the staff through a plate glass window, which is where I found myself standing, talking to the supervisor on duty, Mark Watkins. He asked, "What happened in there?" /p pI said, "This woman burst into the men's area unannounced, saw my scissors and wrote me up." /p pMark: "What did you say to her?"/p pMe: "You aren't supposed to be in the men's area without announcing yourself. Go ask the men, Mark, they'll tell you that she didn't announce herself.”/p pMark: "Okay, I'm going to ask them.”/p pWhen he came back he didn't mention the fact that the men backed me up, instead he said, "You threatened the woman."/p pMe: "How?"/p pMark: "You said to her, 'I'm not through with you’”./p pMe: "You can interpret that in any way you want, Mark, but the fact is that I said to her, "I'm not through talking to you," and it's obvious what that means. After this exchange, I went outside the building to wait for Mark to come out and talk to me. He came out holding my scissors, which he had defined as "a weapon", so he came out of the shelter with a weapon, holding it the way you would hold a knife if you were going to stab someone. /p pWhy did he bring the scissors out in front of the shelter where I was standing except to threaten me? He either wanted me to react, which he could have framed as an attack on him, or he just wanted me to know that he was being threatening and that they could be threatening in that place. In either case, it was totally wrong from him to bring the scissors out there. I have a witness who saw that he held the scissors in a threatening manner and stood over me with slit-eyes./p pAfter Mark talked about the "weapon" for a while he suddenly asked, “Do you feel alright, Mr. Morgan?" This was the same question they asked me through the plate glass window a week before. I had been asked to go outside because I was asking them to be quiet so the men could sleep. Again, I will get the men to testify to this because they were being kept awake though some of them had to work the next day, unlike the staff who sit up at the front desk and laugh and party all night. It takes no brains to do their job and they show it). /p pMark: "Do you feel alright, Mr. Morgan?"/p pI asked: "What are you talking about?"/p pHe asked: "Have you been drinking or doing drugs today?"/p pI asked: "why are you asking me that?" /p pMark: "Because someone said you were acting strange"./p pMe: "Who?"/p pMark: "Someone inside."/p pMe: "Who exactly? Name one person." I can name five people for every person you bring up who will testify that I am the same person tonight that I always am." And, I demand that you have a drug/alcohol test done because you are way out of line here. I have had nothing except penicillin for my tooth./p pMark: "I'll make that evaluation"./p pMe: "Your evaluation is worthless because you can't tell if I've had drugs by looking at me, obviously, because you are saying I am on drugs right now and I am not"./p pMark: "Your eyes look red." He was lying and I knew he was lying and he knew that I knew he was lying and he knew that I knew that he knew that I knew which means that he wanted me to know he was lying and that he was violating my rights. What he failed to comprehend was that it was wrong to do what he was doing and that I was able to go out and do something about the situation and was going out to do so. After getting thrown out, I went downtown and had several friends of mine look at my eyes and they said they were clear as the sky, which, of course, they had to be, given I had done nothing that day or the day before or the day before. However, my eyes could have been red due to lack of sleep because the staff was so loud at night./p pAt any rate, Mark eventually made the decision to let me back into the shelter. I went back inside and told him that I was going to take him to the Human Rights Commission and he said: "You have to get out". /p pI asked, "What did I do?" /p p He said, "You have to leave". Again I asked for what and again he said, "Get out.”/p pOutside at the window he said, "You're under the influence and have to leave for the night.”/p p I said, “If I am under the influence, drug test me. And, you are throwing me out because I made a statement to you so you are violating my right to free speech, not for the stated reason. I am offering to take a full blood test and you know and I know that it will come out negative"./p pSo, I left with no socks on, sandals, the wrong coat (a light coat), and went from the shelter at 8th and Howard to 7th Street where I ran into two guys I knew, one from Ireland, Joker, who had been in the shelter with me and another guy who was staying in the shelter and working with me in the kitchen. We had a good laugh about what had happened. One of them was a security guard and he went back to the shelter to get his uniform and came back to the bar reporting that they were saying that I was running around the shelter with a weapon./p pAfter staying in the shelter for over 90 days, doing volunteer work in the kitchen (the director said, "We couldn't run the shelter without you volunteers; you give more than we do"), landing a job, breaking no shelter rules, on the day I got my housing OK'd I was thrown out for something I did not do and had a night of wandering the street and spending my money sitting up drinking coffee at Carl’s Jr./p pI sleep downstairs in the men's section, which is next to the women's section and a woman was yelling at the staff: "You aren't probation officers and you aren't prison guards. You're just workers.” This was the morning following the night when I was asked to stand outside because I had gone to the front desk and asked them to hold the noise down so we could sleep. I was asked to go outside because "it looked like I was about to get loud" (what does that mean? Intent to get loud?). Now, this woman was yelling at staff and did not get thrown out, but I was suspected of being "about to be loud" while simply asking them to give us our right to sleep (they were partying and yelling at the front desk all night). This was the incident I took to the Human Rights Commission about a week before I was taken outside the Sanctuary and accused of things I did not do (can you say retaliation?)./p pThis morning, October 22, 2001, I told the director of the Sanctuary, Lynn Armstrong, that I was very unhappy about the situation in her shelter and she said she would meet with me about it. I told her I had been trying to get some kind of response from them for years and now I'm not going to talk to just her but to a lot of people. Then I left the place and went out front and gave a speech and told my friends to get ready to march on the place, hold a press conference, write letters, etc. /p pSure Lynn, I'll meet with you to discuss my issues, but I don't expect much from that. If you are not part of the solution, you are part of the problem. How will a person who is part of the problem do me any good except by agreeing to remove the blocks they are throwing up in front of me? If it is not in their interest, why would they help me, compromise with me, work with me? /p pMs. Armstrong, since you are the one who is supposed to oversee how your monitors, supervisors, and staff members treat clients, you are responsible for each and every injustice served out by the brutal and uncaring, manipulative people you allow to police the shelters (of course, this does not apply to all people employed by the Sanctuary, but it does apply to so many that the homeless have frequently asked me if a complete lack of sensitivity is a pre-requisite for obtaining the job of monitor, etc)./p pI was served with the following noticebr / Ibr /3 Notices of Shelter Rule Infractions:br / br /Name of client: Michael Morganbr / br /Date: 10/19/01br / br /Time: 8:45pm/i/p pExplanation of Notice #1: returning to shelter while under the influence of drugs or alcohol. (1B)/p pExplanation of Notice #2: Threats to cause emotional or financial harm to staff or clients (80)/p pExplanation of Notice #3: Possession of a second degree weapon in shelter (6B)br / /p/td/tr/td/tr/table/div/p
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  • Mother Loses Child Over Breastfeeding

    09/24/2021 - 11:35 by Anonymous (not verified)
    Original Author
    root
    Original Body
    pstrongA mother in Urbana, Illinois is ordered to get a larger apartment, stop breast feeding in order to get her son back. /strong/p pDIV align="left" TABLE cellpadding="5"TR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TDTR VALIGN="TOP"TD pby PNN Staff/p pWe have been following the case of the mother whose son was taken away from her by the Illinois Department of Child and Family Services for her breast feeding practices.. The prosecution began when a baby-sitter claimed that the mother was breast feeding her 6 year old son against his will. The DCFS put the child in foster care in July and the Champaign County States Attorney’s office decided to prosecute the mother for abuse and neglect. Judge Ann Einhorn initially ruled that the mother had exposed her son to "enormous potential" for emotional harm. She reversed herself on Dec. 27 and gave the mother 6 moths probation and a list of conditions to meet in order to get her son back.br / The mother countered the allegations by explaining that she was practicing "child-led weaning", where the child would decide when to stop weaning. She claimed that her son gave her no indication that he was ready to stop breast feeding. DCFS also claimed that the son slept in the same bed with the mother and that this was a factor in his removal from the home. The mother explained to the court that she was living in a small apartment that did not have an extra room for him to sleep in. /pp La Leche League reports that several states have prosecuted women for extended breast feeding practices. A Minnesota case against a woman who was supposedly breast feeding a 6 year old in public was dropped when the child was found to be 3 years old. Similar cases of abuse were filed in Florida and Tennessee, but the women were either acquitted or charges were dismissed. The Urbana case would be the first in which a woman was successfully prosecuted for extended breast feeding practices. /pp The mother's insistence that she was practicing "child-led weaning" was ignored by the judge. Articles in the Chicago Tribune and the AP wire insinuated that there was something inappropriate about the mother's continued nursing of her son. A study on advanced aged breast feeding* that was admitted into evidence in the case showed that 34% of parents were still breast feeding after the age of 4. The Associated Press characterized this percentage as "rare, but not unheard of". The mother in Urbana was prosecuted for a practice she has in common with many American families.br / Recent studies have shown that breast feeding into late childhood can be advantageous to the health of the child. There have been numerous studies to show that there is a high correspondence between strong immune systems and breast feeding. There have also been studies to show that the benefits accrue with breast feeding beyond infancy. The US Surgeon General has called any child that is breast feeding at the age of 2 years, "lucky". The WHO reports that the average age of weaning worldwide is 4.2 years. Though this statistic has been called into question, it is clear that many cultures support extended breast feeding as common practice. /pp The most disturbing part of Judge Einhorn's ruling is that, in order to comply fully, the mother must move into a larger dwelling that has an extra bedroom for her son (which she has already done). If poverty is criminalized to the extent that children can be removed from single room occupancies, then few people would be secure in their family's safety. Would affluence have kept this woman and her son together?br / The mother accused the Illinois state Department of Child and Family Services of cultural bias and said they never fully investigated the situation. There is much foundation to thisbr / accusation. The mother explained her nursing philosophy quite clearly and the defense demonstrated that it is a common practice. The only condition that set her apart from mothers around the country was her poverty and it was this factor that made her a target of DCFS. /pp *The study by Texas AM anthropologist Katherine Dettwyler dealt with 1280 families who self-reported breast feeding practices. 375 were still breast feeding at age 4. /pp/p/td/tr/td/tr/table/div/p
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  • Selective Channel pt2

    09/24/2021 - 11:35 by Anonymous (not verified)
    Original Author
    root
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  • Break The Silence Stop The Violence.. (NOW!)

    09/24/2021 - 11:35 by Anonymous (not verified)
    Original Author
    root
    Original Body
    pstrongThe City's Youth speak out against domestic violence/strong/p pDIV align="left" TABLE cellpadding="5"TR VALIGN="TOP"TDIMG SRC= "../sites/default/files/arch_img/543/photo_1_supplement.jpg" //td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TDTR VALIGN="TOP"TD pby Isabel Estrada/Youth in the MEdia Intern/p pI was headed to Break The Silence Stop the Violence, an event concerningbr / domestic violence dedicated to Claire Joyce Tempongko, a young woman who wasbr / murdered by her ex-boyfriend in front of her children. As the event began atbr / eight o'clock and I had to get to where it was at Howard and Sixth Streetsbr / from where I live in the Mission alone, I waded through more than the usualbr / number of guys saying "shit" to me. I was wearing long, loose, black pantsbr / and button up shirt with a sweater and poofy vest over it, nothing that to mebr / asks for any kind of attention. But there you have it. I always walkbr / quickly, staring coldly and too-steadily ahead for fear my eyes mightbr / accidentally wander over to the wrong guy. In that case I may see an old guybr / with his tongue waving around at me or, as has happened at least three timesbr / in my life, my eyes could land directly on the frustrated masturbation ofbr / some guy. /pp I remember the first time that happened. I was walking along 16thbr / street when I was eight with my stepsister who was 12. It was dark out sobr / when I saw some odd movement out of the corner of my eye I wasn't quite surebr / what was going on. Then I heard "ohhhh, my big floppy dick," and I wasbr / stunned, disgusted and very violated all in one second. /ppWe both hesitatedbr / quickly and then continued walking. As the louder, more hot-tempered sisterbr / I yelled back "you fucking asshole." We then walked all the way to the endbr / of the block, then crossed the street and started back where we came from.br / It seems that the man hadn't had his fill of fun for the night because as webr / came back we saw that he had crossed the street and was again with his pantsbr / around his knees as we passed. I freaked out and grabbed my sister to runbr / but she held me back. She later explained that she didn't think he couldbr / come after us very quickly with his pants around his knees and thereforebr / didn't want to give him the satisfaction of seeing us run./p pMen have this constant power of intimidation over women. It's ridiculous.br / There is no comparable situation in which a man can feel as violated andbr / frightened of an unknown woman on the street. Sure we can hurt men in otherbr / ways but we don't have that immediate ascendancy over any man that they canbr / enact with us women just with a single revolting look./p pI wasn't in a particularly sociable mood so when I saw the SOLD OUT sign onbr / the door of the Bindlestiff Theater, housing the event, I was relieved.br / However I could not give up so easily so I rang the doorbell several timesbr / anyway. Eventually someone came out saying I could come in, but that therebr / wouldn't be much room because it was really packed. I'm glad now becausebr / otherwise I would have missed a very special and educational event./p pThe small theater had a warm, personal feel to it. Or maybe that was justbr / caused by the fact that its 60 or so seats were filled, then there were aboutbr / four rows of people sitting in front on the floor added to all the peoplebr / standing around me at the entrance. The space was very dark because theybr / were about to project one of the digital stories that would be interspersedbr / with music and speakers throughout the night./p pThe first one was titled "Lost Boy" and was written and created by Charlesbr / Emmet Stewart. Initially the images consisted of pictures of the family withbr / a woman who I assumed was the mother. She had a sweet smile and acceptingbr / eyes. The narrative was a poem speaking about how the father who beat thisbr / woman completely tore apart the family. It also touched on a common factorbr / in many cases of domestic violence; the ineptitude of the police when calledbr / in for cases. In many situations, they just never show up "they're stuck inbr / their squad cars eating donuts," as the mother is "dead on the bed with abr / pillow to her head." A young man with his back to the viewer, and his headbr / down, facing a gray brick wall was another powerful image. In the end thebr / only way the lost boy could "stop all the pain" was to go to the top of abr / tall building. "He ran and flew, the pain went away‚and you can't fix abr / shattered soul." The audience was overwhelmed by the images of the sweetbr / mother, which contrasted with the bitter story line; the applause grew./p pNext spoke Missy, a young woman from United Playaz, an organization gearedbr / towards Gang Prevention. She spoke about the cycle of violence in generalbr / and how fright and confusion are often what causes it to begin. People oftenbr / fear the unknown, so when we are confronted with hard times, such asbr / unemployment, or when we are the victims of unfair prejudice, we tend to lashbr / out in violent ways. This only causes fright and confusion in other peoplebr / and thus one cycle of violence begins. The police are a special link in thisbr / cycle as they often fear those who they are supposed to be protecting andbr / therefore act in uncalled for ways. A good example is the case of Idrissbr / Stelley, a mentally disabled man, who was shot dead at the Metreon theaterbr / recently. (Apparently the officer had no training in how to deal withbr / mentally disabled people; his fright caused him to shoot when he should havebr / known that Mr. Stelley desperately needed help.) Missy ended by putting itbr / to all people to "take the initiative" to stop the violence./p pThen a group of kids, maybe aged ten to seventeen came on the stage, ready tobr / rap. Their name: Papa Joe's Crew, and they're from the Excelsior branch ofbr / the Columbia Boys and Girls Club. The youngest of them included Yogi,br / Double, Young D., Little CP and Vicious. The boys started out indignantlybr / "they think we're thugs [but we're not]." Then another young man came outbr / and again addressed the cycle of violence, "bad choices come back hungry forbr / blood‚ and What's on the street? Nothing but hate." Towards the end three boysbr / with one girl dedicated a song to all mothers saying "Mama I love you, Mama Ibr / need you."/p pAs the Excelsior kids cleared the stage, exuding boundless energy, our verybr / own Youth in the Media intern Mari, one of the hosts, announced that Markbr / Mitchell's digital video would be up next. He was a tall, stately man with abr / deep, sincere voice who somewhat bashfully came up to the stage to presentbr / his video called "Hate." Mitchell spoke of how his childhood memoriesbr / consisted mostly of "pictures and actions, not words." He recalls the "spitbr / of rage coming from his [father's] lips" as he yelled at Mark's mother,br / before he would take off his belt and whip her. In the video Mark mentions,br / to my amazement, that his mother is still with his father. When he told hisbr / mother that she was strong and asked her why she stayed with the man who hadbr / always beaten her she responded "I'm not strong, God is strong." Mark alsobr / mentions his worry when she told him, "you are your father's son," and thenbr / says, "I hope one day I'll have the strength to stop being my father's sonbr / and be my own man." This seemed an incredibly important statement. So oftenbr / women are seen as weak for allowing themselves to be victims of domesticbr / violence, but the weakness of the man who is so emotionally weak that hebr / cannot control his emotions and insecurities is not often brought up./p pBefore intermission, Mari put out a message of hope, saying that if anyonebr / out there is suffering as a result of domestic violence, that help does existbr / and that there are many others suffering from similar situations. She madebr / the point that "you are not alone."/p pNext up was the rapper Kiwi who brought his usual energy and range ofbr / socially conscious lyrics to the stage. He sang about Sweatshops in thebr / Philippines, about lack of adequate education for children, while in abr / different tune he also sang about love, "the strongest and weakest emotion."br / But he also struck a positive note in his songs: the possibility of fightingbr / back, in his case, through words, "you can't retain me, my spirit is toobr / strong my tongue is a double edged blade, I give multiple stab wounds tobr / thebr / mic."/p pB.J. Garcia's video, "Holes in the Wall" was for me the most touching. Thebr / language was honest and evocative. The images were of chained hands, lockedbr / doors and smiling women. Speaking of his father he said "I kept my backbr / straight so next to him I could stand. He stood so tall and his rage becamebr / my tears." B.J.'s video also touched on an important aspect of domesticbr / violence which is verbal abuse. It's as though verbal abuse takes away allbr / the woman's pride so that she can't fight back when she is being physicallybr / abused. He speaks of how his father would complain of the hours she wouldbr / spend in front of the mirror, saying to his son "her face is still ugly sobr / why does she care?" B.J. ends his film telling his father, "I see you as mybr / enemy and not my dad."/p pThe three young men who made up the group Renaissance were up next. Thebr / people's apathy seemed to be a main theme for them, "Mary J. got me starin'br / at the ceiling." "In fear or anger your IQ drops 20 to thirty points," onebr / of the men mentioned as an explanation for why people are allowing thebr / government free reign to wire tap phone conversations among other civilbr / liberty violations. "Put your hands up," they shouted and my hand went up, Ibr / could feel the beat bouncing, tangible, in the palm of my hand. Another bigbr / topic for this group was to "live life from the perspective of self‚ and thebr / truest revolution starts from self." Unfortunately when they asked "if youbr / love yourself, make some noise," we, the audience, were a little slow tobr / respond. It's odd, I sometimes get stuck thinking that generally certainbr / groups of people are the ones who have problems with self-esteem, but no,br / it's everyone. I belong to a mass of insecure beings headed by groups ofbr / other insecure beings who have control over bombs that can destroy the entirebr / world. How comforting!/p pAnyway, here come Mari again, but this time to present her video, The Rosebr / That Nobody Wanted. But first she encourages everybody to really listen tobr / children when they say they don't want to go home. She says that she isbr / aware that often kids don't want to go home because they may just want tobr / play but when she was a child she didn't want to go home because she wasbr / getting physically abused. It's worth it to really try to listen tobr / children. Mari's video is filled with faceless people, pictures of herbr / family with their faces rubbed. She speaks of getting beaten until she wasbr / "black, blue and red." She grew up with "screaming, yelling, fighting, mebr / and my sister hiding‚ screaming,please, please, I didn't do it." In this case it wasbr / her mother who abused her and her sister. She speaks of the embarrassmentbr / she felt when her friends would ask her where she had gotten so many bruises./p p However Mari ends with a positive note, "the cycle of violence will and hasbr / to stop with me."/p pThe night ends with the band Revolutionareez. I enjoyed the music which wasbr / an eclectic mix of alternative with hip-hop and then a woman who sounded kindbr / of bluesy in the background. The thing that was slightly annoying was thatbr / this woman had an absolutely gorgeous voice and yet in every song she was just the background singer. Then when a spontaneous break dancing circlebr / formed some men got out and danced in the middle but most of the women werebr / just dancing on the sidelines (very much including me). The only girl that Ibr / remember who was willing to be in the middle of the circle formation wasbr / Mari; other then that it was only men. It makes me mad at myself and atbr / other women that we tend not to assert ourselves, not to bring attention tobr / ourselves except physically. As though we were ornamentation for men. It's really true; the change has to come from within./p p/p/td/tr/td/tr/table/div/p
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  • Case Study #3: To Feed or not to Feed?

    09/24/2021 - 11:35 by Anonymous (not verified)
    Original Author
    root
    Original Body
    pstrongHow Do I Help My Daughter?br /br / Carmen's* Story/strong/p pDIV align="left" TABLE cellpadding="5"TR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TDTR VALIGN="TOP"TD pby PNN/p pI knew that there was something wrong with my daughter. I knewbr / that she was sick, had some sort of illness that was making her continue tobr / gain weight. She just kept gaining and gaining, and I knew that her healthbr / was at risk. What I didn'tbr / know was how to help her. All I could do was try to take care of her inbr / the best way, the only way that I knew how. No parent wants to sit therebr / and watch their child become sicker and sicker, weaker and weaker. Nobr / parent wants to believe that they are helpless to aid their child, or evenbr / worse, that they are making their child even more ill. But then again,br / there is no parent who could find it easy to deny their child food, tobr / forcefully stop her from eating when all she can do is plead for more./p pWe were trying to help our daughter. We took her to doctors, andbr / all they did was confuse us even more. No one seemed able to give us anybr / real answers about what was happening to her. So when Child Protectivebr / Services came to take her away that day, we could say nothing to defendbr / themselves. Watching my daughter being taken away from us, seeing her inbr / so much fear, so much misery, it was like my whole world was falling apart.br / Not only was this poor little child facing this terrible illness, but nowbr / she was being removed from the only family that she ever knew, the onlybr / people who had ever nurtured and loved her. Why these people believed thatbr / foster parents, strangers, in fact, could take better care of our daughterbr / than we could, I will never know. All I do understand is that instead ofbr / helping us, instead of keeping us united as a family, and providing us withbr / the resources and information that we needed to battle my daughtersbr / condition and the resulting weight problem, these officials ripped mybr / family apart. The very organization whose job it is to work for andbr / protect children and families decided instead to subject a defenselessbr / three- year- old girl to a trauma like none she had ever known before./p pNow we know that my daughter probably has a disease that preventsbr / her from ever knowing that she is full. She gets no satisfaction frombr / eating, and that's why she can't seem to stop. Instead of helping us tobr / learn about this disease and how to help her, however, C.P.S. and thebr / courts have kept us and our daughter apart. Not only are we facing abr / struggle against my daughter's health problems, but now we are alsobr / dealing with another tragedy: the separation that our family has had tobr / endure, and the trauma that my daughter experienced because of it./p pi*names changed to protect identity./i/p pbCourtWatch Responds***/b /ppIn the case of Carmen* and her daughter, the staff at CourtWatchbr / felt immediately obligated to assist and advocate for this family in anybr / way that we could.br / We first heard about this injustice on a talk radio show on KGO. Itbr / captured our attention because Carmen's daughter was removed from herbr / parents' care with little or no investigation of her health condition, evenbr / though there was a strong possibility that her weight was a result of abr / rare disorder and not neglect on the part of her family. Rather thanbr / offering to help Carmen's family find the resources that they needed tobr / address their daughter's problem, Child Protective Services criminalizedbr / the parents and mercilessly ripped their child away from them, placing herbr / in the care of foster parents who knew even less about her condition thanbr / Carmen and her husband./p pBecause the case received a great deal of attention from the media,br / the judge instituted a gag order, and the staff at Poor Magazine was unablebr / to receive any further information about the case or to make contact withbr / the family itself. Since we felt that it was imperative to offer thembr / whatever help we could, however, we decided to advocate for Carmen and herbr / husband in the form of a series of communications with the judge who heardbr / the case and the C.P.S. worker who was handling it. We also attempted tobr / contact the families' attorney, and made numerous calls to his officebr / offering our assistance, but as of yet we have not heard from him./p pAs soon as we hear any news regarding this case and/or others likebr / it, Poor Magazine will include that timely information in the CourtWatchbr / column./p p/p/td/tr/td/tr/table/div/p
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  • Whip Lash

    09/24/2021 - 11:35 by Anonymous (not verified)
    Original Author
    root
    Original Body
    pDIV align="left" TABLE cellpadding="5"TR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TDTR VALIGN="TOP"TD pby Samuel Irving/p pIn a prehistoric method,br /br / I study lifebr /br / From the point of br /br / The culture less exposurebr /br / To the sun, br /br / I am told that I am not br /br / A man even thoughbr /br / My hairs count many years br //p pBut yet affects br /br / Of my so called br /br / Taming ring throughbr /br / The echoes of cursed names/p piBoy/i/p pBecomes my titlebr /br / As I am engaged tobr /br / This field of order, br /br / Unlike the miseducationbr /br / That scorns my tired hands/p piBoy/i/p pI guess that’s me, br /br / Time is nothing br /br / But a beating awaybr /br / From the norm, br /br / For me and relativebr /br / To a common situation/p piBoy/i/p pRight away master, br /br / To pick some good br /br / Crops amongst ignorancebr /br / Entrapping my views/p pBOY IS NOT MY NAME/p pWhile the response comesbr /br / Through the blood scars br /br / Of my back, I am given a nicknamebr /br / That my own people adopt, br /br / But I can’t identify tobr /br / /p/td/tr/td/tr/table/div/p
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  • Where's my stuff; The Epilogue

    09/24/2021 - 11:35 by Anonymous (not verified)
    Original Author
    root
    Original Body
    pstrongProposed Legislation which would have given houseless San Franciscans 24 hour notice before their belongings were seized was not passed by the "progressive" SF Board of Supervisors/strong/p pDIV align="left" TABLE cellpadding="5"TR VALIGN="TOP"TDIMG SRC= "../sites/default/files/arch_img/544/photo_1_supplement.jpg" //td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TDTR VALIGN="TOP"TD pby Laurie McElroy/PoorNewsNetwork/p pI slept on the street for two more months than I had to in the winter of 1996, as some of the worst storms and most violent flooding in ten years rolled over the SF bay area. The (Department of Public Works) garbage men took my California identification that November so I could not rent a room even when I had the money, because of Duh Mayor’s enlightened policy of confiscating and trashing homeless peoples’ belongings./p pMy friends and advocates at the Coalition On Homelessness (COH) have spent upwards of five years lobbying City Hall for a change in the so - called “homeless laws” that would make 24 hour (at least) warnings a mandatory prerequisite to seizing and throwing away the belongings of people in my situation. This year the COH finally persuaded the new, “progressive” Board of Supervisors to toss around the idea of amending pertinent sections of the SF Public Works Code to include provisions for notice, and storage of removed property, but after five weeks of Rules Committee meetings and endless re - referrals, it appears the Board has not just fumbled but completely dropped the legislative ball in a morass of interminable delays./p pOn October 21st, I attended a Supervisors’ meeting, the sixth such meeting to raise the issue of legislating a guarantee that homeless citizens receive a 24 hour warning before Department of Public Works employees seize their belongings. Mayor Slick Willie set the tone for a recall vote by hypocritically bemoaning the economic “situation” in which San Francisco (downtown) finds itself, since his artificially induced dot - com boom has petered to a bust. Board president and author of the legislation Tom Ammiano, sent up a glaring red flag with an intro to the discussion that rang more like a funeral eulogy... “No matter how the vote goes,” he intoned ominously,” I really hope the dialogue continues.” A tightfaced woman in the audience, whom I recognized as from the COH, laughed./p pMy stomach entered freefall with that brittle chuckle./p p“This legislation is promoting a way of life that encourages people to leave their bags on the street, “said Supervisor Hall, miraculously deadpan. “It’s not helping anyone...” The “ -I care about helping” part was clearly implied in his sneer and casual demeanor. Hall also expressed his concern that the item made no apparent address to the underlying problems that make homelessness happen. Supe Gavin Newsom came out against the amendments on the floor, saying it will make shopping cart collection more difficult., which gave me a good idea of where he put property rights on his list of priorities. Later, he slung me a soundbyte, saying “I appreciate the intent, it was a noble effort, but I had to vote no on this because of what I saw as the unintended consequences, the hidden costs... I feel the money would be better spent on dealing with the root causes of homelessness.” /p pSaid Supe Matt Gonzales, in response to Newsome and Hall, “It’s great we’re suddenly so interested in having this dialogue on solving homelessness...” He continued, “When we criticise this legislation, we’re criticising the eyesore the posessions ( of the homeless ) represent.” Supervisor Chris Daly urged all present to revisit Continuum of Care, the official City and County of SF homeless policy. “This is existing legislation that has all the solutions to these questions we’re asking, if only it’s implemented... we must hold the Mayor accountable!”/p pThe vote split 7 to 4 in favor of rescindsion, which abruptly halted my stomach plunge *splat!* on the flat granite of disappointment. But I walked out of the conference hall with a held - high air and a set to my jaw. The best of all our stuff is what we have inside, because that’s what we resist with. They won’t ever get that. /p piThe Civil Rights Workgroup of The Coalition on Homelessness is planning an action in response in November to this decision. The Workgroup is having planning meetings for this action every Wednesday in November at 4:30 pm at 468 Turk St in SF. For more information please call them at (415) 346-3740br / /i/p/td/tr/td/tr/table/div/p
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  • Amish Seek Exemption From Child Labor Laws

    09/24/2021 - 11:35 by Anonymous (not verified)
    Original Author
    root
    Original Body
    pstrongHR 221 Faces Senate Vote/strong/p pDIV align="left" TABLE cellpadding="5"TR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TD/td/trTR VALIGN="TOP"TDTR VALIGN="TOP"TD pby PNN/p pAmish families in Pennsylvania are seeking to rewrite laws concerning child labor. Traditional family life for the Amish includes work for children. Religious and secular education ends at the age of 14 for the Amish; This is the age that Amish youth are expected to become productive members of society. /p pFederal law prevents children under 16 from working at manufacturing jobs, and children under 18 from working under certain types of hazardous conditions./p pMany Amish communities rely on sawmills and other manufacturing plants as cornerstones of their economy. The Justice Department prosecuted several people for allowing youth to work in plants./p pThe Amish have been lobbying for a change in the laws. HR 221 provides a waiver for Amish children from current child labor laws. It passed in the House of Representatives on March 2, 1999 and now faces a Senate vote. /p pSupporters of the bill feel that it promotes the Amish tradition of apprenticeship. They feel it will help Amish families remain solvent and retain their culture. There are over 150,000 Amish people in the US and Canada. /ppDetractors worry that children do not have the attention span of adults and that they are more likely to be injured by heavy equipment.br / /p/td/tr/td/tr/table/div/p
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